- LEARNING TOGETHER | JUNE 3, 2020 (UPDATED) -

BLACK LIVES MATTER: RESOURCES FOR EDUCATION

I had always planned to pen a post about racism and resources for the education of the topic once I felt as though I knew enough to write a meaningful piece and share substantial information. However, right now, as the world’s attention has finally been grabbed by this hounding issue, the timing equates to people wanting these resources now. So, to begin with, I’m sharing a list of resources, some of which I have delved into heavily, and others that have been recommended and are on my hot-list to read and listen to, that grabbed my attention while starting my education on the history of racism, how black people are treated in a white world, white privilege and how to actively become an anti-racist. 

 

As there is an abundance of heavy information circulating in the news and social media currently, I have decided to include some ‘easier reads and listens’ too for those beginning their education, so you can listen to and connect with black people who are talking about their experiences of racism and racial oppression in a safe environment. These lists will be updated as and when I discover new resources and given other recommendations. 

Before I start, I wrote a comment on Instagram on Black Out Tuesday, and I want to share what I wrote on my blog for anyone who would like to read it and hasn’t yet. It’s quoted underneath these lists. 

BOOKS

 

Why I’m No Longer Talking To White People About Race

Reni Eddo Lodge

LINK

 

How To Be An Anti-Racist

Ibram X. Kendi

LINK

 

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard For White People To Talk About Racism

Robin DiAngelo

LINK

 

The Good Immigrant

Edited by Nikesh Shukla 

LINK

How To Argue With A Racist: History, Science, Race & Reality

Adam Rutherford

LINK

So You Want To Talk About Race

Ijeoma Oluo

LINK

DOCUMENTARIES AND FILMS

13th

Directed by Ava DuVernay

Netflix & Youtube

LINK

 

PODCASTS, INTERVIEWS AND CONVERSATIONS

 

Pretty Big Deal With Ashley Graham

 

Gabrielle Union

8:03 - 11:35, 13:30 - 14:27 & 15:18 - 23:44 (police and gun violence)

Gabrielle talks with Ashley about police brutality, gun violence and discrimination against black people. 

LINK

Elaine Welteroth

1.36 onwards

Elaine talks to Ashley about having to grow up identifying as a black person despite being biracial. 

LINK

 

About Race With Reni Eddo Lodge

Podcast with the author of Why I’m No Longer Talking To White People About Race

Available on Apple Podcasts

 

Interview: Emma Watson with Paris Lees

3.45 - 5.30 

In this clip Emma Watson talks to Paris Lees about her time studying in the States and the white perspective of, and slant on history, as well as the author of Why I No Longer Talk To White People About Race, Reni Eddo Lodge, and her writing. 

LINK

SMALL, EVERYDAY ACTIONS THAT YOU CAN DO TO MAKE A BIG DIFFERENCE IN COMBATING RACISM. 

 

When you hear someone being racist, or saying micro-aggressions of a racist nature, challenge these views and help to educate others. 

 

Take the time to learn about the history of racism using multiple resources. Understanding the history of an issue through a variety of perspectives gives us the tools and knowledge to resolve the issue.

 

Support black-owned brands, including those in the makeup industry, fashion industry, food industry - you name it, support it. Actively do not support brands that have shown racist behaviour or an inability to be inclusive, such as, for example, when brands do not include foundation shades with suitable undertones or depths for black people. Another example includes brands that do not include black people in their advertising. 

 

Actively contribute to an environment where people feel comfortable standing up and saying “that isn’t right” without feeling fearful of repercussions or worrying that they are going to be perceived as aggressive or a troublemaker. Do this both for black people defending themselves, and white people standing up for this discrimination and injustice black people face. Only in this way will people be able to have their voice’s heard and for change to start to be implemented. 

From a psychological understanding point of view protests grab the attention; calm education is the one of the best ways to ensure someone is listening to you, and not just hearing the loud noise being made. In this way, the powerful message being conveyed will reach and be noted in the minds of even more people. 

MY COMMENT FROM INSTAGRAM ON BLACK OUT TUESDAY

2 JUNE 2020

"As a white person living in a white-majority area, despite growing up in a non-racist household, I have been exposed to hearing unacceptable comments of a racist nature about innocent black people at bars, in pubs, at parties, on TV, at school and on social media. I will never forget when I heard a beautiful three year old boy being referred to as “coffee” with a scoff, rather than his name. 

 

Over the past few years, I have educated myself on a variety of issues, and when at the age of 19 I made my first black friend and listened to accounts of the racist abuse he faced, despite being a sweet and caring human, I knew I had to study about how to be actively anti-racist. 

 

Has anyone ever ignored you, or given you inadequate support, after a close friend or family member died? Has anyone ever done this, or stood back and watched while you were bullied? Has anyone ever questioned your memory of the pain you feel, or tried to tell you to “move on” and “live your life”? Has anyone ever watched the stream of #BeKind and mental health posts on social media and wondered why none of these people were helping you, despite the fact that they were away of your suffering? Have you ever been the bystander? Have you ever been the oppressor? As white people, we will never truly understand what it feels like to be the target of racism, however, we can relate to the emotion in some capacity. It is not good enough to stand back and do nothing, it is worse to simply suggest that people get on with their lives. It shows no empathy or willingness to understand your fellow man. 

 

It is not good enough to simply be non-racist if you are not challenging the abuse you hear as soon as it leaves that person’s lips. Ignorance is not an excuse for being racist. We all know the difference between right and wrong, we all know that treating someone badly is also wrong - the difference is whether or not you will stand up for what is right in a meaningful way."

BLOG BY TORI VALE

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